Munich, a place for real estate
 

There's no doubt that Munich is one of the most coveted places to live in Germany. Most surveys show that Bavaria's capital city is the number one location for residential property. In addition to its Mediterranean flair, locals appreciate first and foremost the parks and the high degree of safety and security. Among Germany's major cities, Munich is considered the one with the least social problems. The Bavarian cosmopolitan city is also one of the most attractive business centers in the country. A well-balanced range of sectors that includes companies in manufacturing and service industries, provides a broad spectrum of job opportunities and a consistently high level of employment. Six DAX companies alone have their headquarters in the Greater Munich Area, more DAX companies than any other German city.

The number of inhabitants is growing in parallel to the number of jobs. Since the middle of the 90s, the population of Bavaria's largest city has followed a positive trend. It has long been among the most densely populated areas in the country. In late 2012 there were 1.39 million inhabitants; that figure has already reached 1.5 million today and continues to rise. Experts anticipate that the area will reach 1.7 million inhabitants by 2030. That means that Munich is and will remain one of the strongest growing cities in Germany. Since the room for building housing is getting more and more scarce, those who build or invest in residential property can be relatively certain that it will rise in value over the coming years. By the way, Munich's residents are also among the highest earners in the nation. It has the highest purchasing power of all urban districts.

However, it's by no means just the city itself that draws people in hordes. It's also the unique geographical location. There's a reason Munich is often called the northernmost city in Italy. When the weather is good, you have a spectacular view of the Alps and the Zugspitze, Germany's highest mountain, is only an hour away. Blomberg is even closer, with its ski slopes and summer toboggan run, which also make it a popular excursion destination for Munich natives. There are many lakes within reach by commuter train and thus basically on your front doorstep, such as Starnberger See, Ammersee, Pilsensee, and Wörthsee. Those who prefer mountain lakes like Tegernsee, Schliersee, Kochelsee and Walchensee, can get to them in an hour by train or car.

In general, the people of Munich can choose from a multitude of recreational options whatever the direction of travel, and all within a half-hour's drive. Cyclists can get their fill riding through tranquil forests, along the Isar and Würm rivers or through quiet towns. Beer gardens are often nearby to offer you a shady place for a break and refreshments. It's worth leaving the car at home and using the commuter train because the extensive network ensures that many of these destinations are easily reached by public transit.